PMT Pretests

Oxygen and Ventilation Test 2

This is the second test about oxygenation and ventilation (airway management). This material is generally presented and explained after a classroom course or after an ACLS textbook has gone through the ACLS basics.

Note: Answers to this test are available here.

Questions 1 through 5 are based on the following scenario:

While on your rounds with a fellow staff member of your hospital, you notice a female patient of 78 is unresponsive in her bed.

1. The first step is to open her airway and check for breathing:

  1. For up to 10 seconds.

  2. For up to 5 seconds.

  3. For 2 to 3 seconds.

  4. For 30 seconds.

2. You determine the patient is not currently breathing. Using a pocket mask with an oxygen inlet, you connect oxygen tubing and set the oxygen flow rate to:

  1. 10 to 12 L/min.

  2. 4 to 6 L/min.

  3. 1 to 2 L/min.

  4. 8 to 10 L/min.

3. All of the following statements about ventilating the patient with the pocket mask are false except:

  1. A deep breath should be taken before each ventilation, followed by ventilation at a rate of 15 to 20 breaths per minute.

  2. A normal breath should be taken before each ventilation, followed by ventilation at a rate of 12 to 20 breaths per minute.

  3. A normal breath should be taken before each ventilation, followed by ventilation at a rate of 10 to 12 breaths per minute.

  4. A deep breath should be taken before each ventilation, followed by ventilation at a rate of 12 to 15 breaths per minute.

4. You now determine that the patient does not have a pulse. You have your coworker perform chest compressions while you continue using the pocket mask for positive-pressure ventilation. All of the following statements are false except:

  1. A ratio of 30 compressions to 2 ventilations is recommended in this situation.

  2. A ratio of 15 compressions to 2 ventilations is recommended in this situation.

  3. In a two-rescuer adult CPR situation, the ventilation rate should be slowed down to 6 to 8 per minute.

  4. The chest compression rate should be 120 to 150 per minute.

5. Checking the AED, you see that it is indicating "No Shock Advised". The patient has now been intubated by your coworker: proper tube placement has been checked, the tube is correctly secured, and the tube teeth marking recorded. All of the following statements are false except:

  1. Periodic pauses during chest compressions are important to permit adequate ventilation with the bag-valve device.

  2. With no interruptions allowed, chest compressions should be performed and the rate of ventilations changed to 8 to 10 bpm.

  3. With no interruptions allowed, chest compressions should be performed and the rate of ventilations changed to 20 to 24 bpm.

  4. Every 30 seconds, chest compressions should be interrupted so the rescuers can deliver ventilations through the ET tube (with the bag-valve device).

6. It is more common to have intubation of the left mainstem bronchus than the right mainstem bronchus. True or False?

7. All of the following statements about the nasal airway are correct except:

  1. A nosebleed can result from forceful insertion of the nasal airway.

  2. For patients with heavy cranio-facial trauma, the proper airway adjunct is the nasal airway.

  3. A water-soluble lubricant should be used before insertion of a nasal airway.

  4. A nasal airway can be tolerated by most responsive or semi-responsive patients.

8. Endotracheal intubation:

  1. Should be performed in under 60 seconds.

  2. Is contraindicated in unresponsive patients.

  3. Should only be performed after efforts to ventilate using a different method.

  4. Prevents aspiration of gastric contents.

View the answers to this test here.